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Subspecialties Basic & Translational Research, Retina, Retina

Changing the Program

Müller glia cells, abundant in the retina, are known to support retinal cell function. But they also have another support function: retinal regeneration. In cold-blooded vertebrates, such as zebrafish, it is well known that Müller glia can act as a source of stem cells to induce retinal repair and regeneration. But this regenerative capacity is absent in mammals; although cell proliferation might occur in response to injury, these cells do not repair or regenerate the retina. Now, a team from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA, have shown that they were able to reprogram Müller glia to generate rod photoreceptors, and restore light perception in a mouse model of congenital blindness (1).

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About the Author

Ruth Steer

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