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Subspecialties Retina, Health Economics and Policy, Practice Management

Responding to Non-Responders

At a Glance

  • There are no strict guidelines for dealing with DME patients who don’t respond to anti-VEGF injections
  • Available options include continuing with the same treatment, switching to another anti-VEGF agent, or switching to a dexamethasone implant
  • A recent real-world study shows better outcomes in patients who switched to a dexamethasone implant, compared with patients who were given further anti-VEGF injections.

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About the Author

Catharina Busch

Practicing ophthalmologist and researcher at the University Hospital of Leipzig, Germany.

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