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Subspecialties Cataract, Business and Innovation, Practice Management

It’s a Conversation, Not a Conversion

At a Glance

  • FLACS is as safe and effective as manual cataract surgery – but some practices struggle with its integration, with uptake relying on effective internal and external marketing, well-structured refractive packages and optimized practice workflow
  • Successful conversions often start long before the patient even walks through the door, by planting the seed with primary eye care doctors who are referring patients for surgery
  • Once the patient is on-board, surgeons should stress the undeniable benefits of FLACS: precision, reproducibility and automation
  • Don’t be afraid to talk costs at the initial consult – it puts the patients at ease and gives them the information they need to make a measured decision, saving you and your refractive counselor’s time.

Approximately 65 percent of patients undergoing cataract surgery in our practice choose to have femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) – a relatively high conversion rate, given the low mean household income in the market in which I practice. It’s not a new thing either. We’ve been consistently reaching this high conversion rate since we launched FLACS, and we’ve done it without any level of effort I’d consider extraordinary.

On the contrary, it was a very natural and organic fit for our practice and the mindset of our team. So how is this possible? I believe it’s due to a number of factors, including effective internal and external marketing, the way we structure refractive packages and our workflow. However, by far the most important factor is how my partners and I personally view the value of the laser. Put simply, we believe this technology helps us better serve patients.  If we didn’t, we wouldn’t offer it.

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About the Author

Blake Williamson

Blake Williamson is a cataract and refractive surgeon at Williamson Eye Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA

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