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Subspecialties Imaging & Diagnostics, Imaging & Diagnostics, Neuro-ophthalmology

Then There Was Light

Who?

Milena Canning suffered a respiratory infection and a series of strokes that damaged her occipital lobe – the part of the brain responsible for processing vision. When she emerged from an eight-week coma, she was completely blind. One day, when a friend brought in a gift bag, she noticed that it looked “sparkly” – the first of many experiences where she was able to report seeing motion. When she told her physicians, they suggested she was hallucinating. Someone suggested she meet with a neurologist, Gordon Dutton, in Glasgow, UK. He diagnosed it as Riddoch syndrome.

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About the Author

Phoebe Harkin

Associate Editor of The Ophthalmologist

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