Cookies

Like most websites The Ophthalmologist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Subspecialties Basic & Translational Research, Retina

Scattered Light

Researchers at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, USA, have developed a light-scattering technique to screen for Alzheimer’s disease. The technique – angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) – combines imaging modalities to measure both the thickness and the texture of various layers of the retina. Studies have shown that Alzheimer’s disease can cause structural changes to the retina. Notably, thinning of the inner retinal layers can indicate a decrease in the amount of neural tissue, suggesting Alzheimer’s is present. However, other diseases – namely, glaucoma and Parkinson’s – can cause similar thinning. The researchers hopes this new measurement could be a more easily accessible biomarker for Alzheimer’s and are are now incorporating the technology into a low-cost clinical OCT scanner (currently awaiting FDA clearance). Built with 3D-printed parts, the scanner is portable and lightweight at just four pounds. We speak to Adam Wax, Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Physics at Duke and the technique’s creator, to find out more. 

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Ophthalmologist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Ophthalmologist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

Phoebe Harkin

Associate Editor of The Ophthalmologist

I’ve always loved telling stories. So much so, I decided to make a job of it. I finished a Masters in Magazine Journalism and spent three years working as a creative copywriter before itchy feet sent me (back)packing. It took seven months and 13 countries, but I’m now happily settled on The Ophthalmologist, where I’m busy getting stuck into all things eyeballs.

Register to The Ophthalmologist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Ophthalmologist magazine

Register