Cookies

Like most websites The Ophthalmologist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Subspecialties Neuro-ophthalmology, Comprehensive, Basic & Translational Research

Dazed and Confused

What can eyes tell us about the brain? A recent report has found that horizontal and vertical self-paced saccades – the rapid movements of the eye between fixation points – act as a biomarker of traumatic brain injury (TBI). To test this hypothesis, researchers compared the horizontal and vertical saccades of people with no history of TBI and patients with a clinical diagnosis of TBI using RightEye eye-tracking technology. A total of 287 clinically verified participants, reporting either no TBI, mild, moderate or severe TBI participated in the tests. They concluded that eye tracking was an objective and quantifiable way of measuring not just the presence of TBI, but also the severity of the condition. Melissa Hunfalvay, Chief Scientific Officer at RightEye, explains why the technology is so necessary.

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Ophthalmologist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Ophthalmologist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

Phoebe Harkin

Associate Editor of The Ophthalmologist

I’ve always loved telling stories. So much so, I decided to make a job of it. I finished a Masters in Magazine Journalism and spent three years working as a creative copywriter before itchy feet sent me (back)packing. It took seven months and 13 countries, but I’m now happily settled on The Ophthalmologist, where I’m busy getting stuck into all things eyeballs.

Register to The Ophthalmologist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Ophthalmologist magazine

Register