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Subspecialties Diabetes, Retina

A New Purpose

Montelukast – a leukotriene inhibitor – is well known to asthma sufferers, who benefit from its proven ability to prevent wheezing and shortness of breath. But researchers believe it may have a new indication: diabetic retinopathy. A team at the University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine studied the effect of montelukast on diabetic retinopathy – a condition characterized by neuronal and vascular degeneration – using a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. The results were impressive: after nine months, the retinal microvasculature from untreated diabetic mice demonstrated a nearly threefold increase in capillary degeneration compared to mice treated with montelukast. We spoke to senior author Rose Gubitosi-Klug, Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology at UH Rainbow and the William T. Dahms Professor of Pediatrics at CWRU School of Medicine, to find out more.

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About the Author

Phoebe Harkin

Associate Editor of The Ophthalmologist

I’ve always loved telling stories. So much so, I decided to make a job of it. I finished a Masters in Magazine Journalism and spent three years working as a creative copywriter before itchy feet sent me (back)packing. It took seven months and 13 countries, but I’m now happily settled on The Ophthalmologist, where I’m busy getting stuck into all things eyeballs.

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