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Business & Profession Basic & Translational Research, Health Economics and Policy

Up in Smoke

Researchers have found a link between long-term air pollution and intraocular pressure – but only in those susceptible to oxidative stress. In the innovative study, the team collected data from 419 older men, measured each participant’s eye pressure – and collected a host of other health factors – and analyzed the data against a black carbon modeling program. Black carbon – a common air pollutant – is smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter and capable of penetrating deep into the lungs, and the bloodstream. They found that men with certain genetic variations – namely, those vulnerable to oxidative stress – experienced increased eye pressure.

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About the Author

Phoebe Harkin

Associate Editor of The Ophthalmologist

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