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Subspecialties Comprehensive, Practice Management

Visualize This

sponsored by Ocutrx Vision Technologies

A recent survey of AAO members found that 51.8 percent of surgeons reported neck, lower back, upper body, or other musculoskeletal pain, with 15 percent being limited in their work as a result. Of those, 7 percent required corrective surgery. The reality is that current operating systems often are center of ergonomic issues.

Enter the OR-Bot™ Surgery Visualization Theatre from Ocutrx, a new, all-digital surgery system that safeguards surgeons by minimizing the strain on their upper body with three unique visualization options:
• ORLenz™: a 4K AR/XR headset that has the widest field-of-view in the industry and the highest resolution the eye can see at 20/20 – 60 pixels per degree.
• StereoLenz™: an 8K auto-stereoscopic 3D “glasses-free” monitor that enables the surgeon to look straight ahead, instead of turning their head to see a monitor.
• MiniLenz™: a 4K VR microscope that is detached from the standard operating microscope and camera combination, alleviating constraints in the surgeon’s operating space.

In addition to tackling the key concern of musculoskeletal pain, the OR-Bot also solves a number of space-constraint issues that surgeons face by separating the camera from the microscope, which reduces the amount of equipment between patient and physician.

Unlike existing systems, the OR-Bot does not require the surgeon to crane their neck to view the monitor, which allows surgeons to practice their art for longer, with less pain – thus giving them the best chance to improve patient outcomes and perform surgeries longer into their careers. How? Each option delivers a live-action 4K video feed, guaranteeing the surgeon sees holographic images in the highest resolution the eye can see.

To guarantee maximum performance, Ocutrx Vision Technologies partnered with Qualcomm for its newest and most powerful chipset, the XR-2 – an exclusive, energy efficient design that facilitates both wireless and tetherless operation. The Artificial Intelligence engine within the chipset boasts seven teraOPS of computing capability – roughly 7 trillion calculations per second – for running machine learning models on the OR-Bot’s visualization systems. But it doesn’t stop there. AT&T, a global Internet of Things (IoT) leader, teamed up with Ocutrx to provide the suite’s IoT and 5G solutions, making the OR-Bot the most connected surgical system on the market today.

Ocutrx Vision Technologies developed the technology in response to direct feedback from surgeons. In addition to tackling the key concern of musculoskeletal pain, the OR-Bot also solves a number of space-constraint issues that surgeons face by separating the camera from the microscope, which reduces the amount of equipment between patient and physician.

With real-time access to data, and improved resolution, ergonomics, visuals, and field-of-view, the OR-Bot is more than a piece of equipment – it’s the stuff of fatigued surgeons’ dreams.

www.oculenz.com

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