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Subspecialties Basic & Translational Research, Retina

Retinal Imaging in Your Hand

Making a cumbersome device more portable often results in broader applicability and greater convenience (think desktop>laptop>tablet). Some miniaturization challenges, however, seem insurmountable: how exactly do you turn an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) – something the size of a billiard table – into a pocket-sized device? After all, AOSLO has to be big to accommodate and integrate the AO components: a wavefront sensor to detect optical aberrations and a deformable mirror to compensate for those aberrations. Without them, you can’t achieve accurate, high-resolution imaging. With them, AOSLO is limted to ‘easy’ patients who can sit upright and fixate for several minutes, which excludes young children and supine or semi-recumbent adults (for example, anaesthetized patients).

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