Cookies

Like most websites The Ophthalmologist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Subspecialties Neuro-ophthalmology

Number Games

In eyecare, we often refer to “count fingers” when it comes to characterizing poor vision. But counting fingers is an example of a visual, numerical cue that helps everything from sighted, preverbal infants to non-human animals like dogs and horses learn to count.  It’s known that reasoning about both approximate and exact numbers depends on a region of the brain’s cortex called the fronto-parietal network, in particular, the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). The IPS is an interesting region – it sits near the visual cortex, and is also involved in a number of aspects of vision, from saccades to depth perception. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have suggested that IPS activity during numerical processing can be seen in children from the age of four years, and that the harder the mathematical problem, the harder the IPS works. But this begs a question: four-year olds have been counting for years before their IPS lights up on fMRI, so how much does (visual) experience – like the counting of fingers or chocolate buttons – contribute to IPS development?

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Ophthalmologist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Ophthalmologist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

Mark Hillen

I spent seven years as a medical writer, writing primary and review manuscripts, congress presentations and marketing materials for numerous – and mostly German – pharmaceutical companies. Prior to my adventures in medical communications, I was a Wellcome Trust PhD student at the University of Edinburgh.

Register to The Ophthalmologist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Ophthalmologist magazine

Register