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Subspecialties Retina, Retina, Retina, Imaging & Diagnostics

Light Years Ahead

Imaging modalities like OCT, and AO-SLO have transformed our ability to stage and diagnose retinal disease. But in many respects it’s only showing you the pathologic structural changes that occur after the damage has been done. Take the example of diabetic retinopathy. By the time a patient begins to notice problems with their vision, they’ve lost a significant portion of it – and a hefty number of cells in the retina too. Much like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, interventions at this point are almost palliative: current therapies try to slow the diseases progression, but they can’t replace what’s lost.

But what if you could detect disease processes before permanent damage has happened? At a point where early, disease-altering interventions – some as simple as lifestyle changes – could be made? Sound unrealistic? Apparently not. It seems there is a way - by using mitochondrial function as a marker of retinal health.

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About the Author

Roisin McGuigan

I have an extensive academic background in the life sciences, having studied forensic biology and human medical genetics in my time at Strathclyde and Glasgow Universities. My research, data presentation and bioinformatics skills plus my ‘wet lab’ experience have been a superb grounding for my role as a deputy editor at Texere Publishing. The job allows me to utilize my hard-learned academic skills and experience in my current position within an exciting and contemporary publishing company.

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