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Subspecialties Cornea / Ocular Surface, Refractive

Kerarings in the Clinic

At a Glance

  • Many options are now available for the treatment of corneal ectasia, including intrastromal corneal ring segments (ICRS)
  • Numerous clinical studies have shown that ICRS restore contact lens tolerance, improve visual acuity and may delay or eliminate the need for corneal transplantation
  • A study conducted in my clinic showed that Keraring ICRS reduce corneal asphericity and keratometric astigmatism
  • ICRS have a long track record of use for various corneal applications and typically demonstrate a good safety profile along with their visual improvements

Corneal ectatic disorders – like keratoconus, pellucid marginal degeneration (PMD) and iatrogenic post-LASIK ectasia – are principally characterized by a biomechanically unstable cornea. Thinning occurs in the central, paracentral, or peripheral cornea, leading to corneal steepening that commonly results in visual disturbances and poor best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (1).

As little as 15 years ago, such patients were typically offered rigid contact lenses to “smooth” the surface of the cornea and improve their visual acuity. But when those lenses failed or became intolerable, corneal transplantation was really the only option left. The optical outcomes after corneal transplantation were generally very good, but procedures like penetrating keratoplasty are associated with a number of ocular adverse events too, like accelerated cataract development, microbial keratitis and glaucoma (2,3).

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