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Subspecialties Retina, Imaging & Diagnostics

Heads Up!

In heads-up surgery, the surgeon performs microsurgical procedures, not by bending over and looking through the eyepieces of a surgical microscope, but by viewing images sent from a three-dimensional (3-D) camera on a large flat panel display. My department has adopted this technology, and our five “heads-up” surgeons have now performed over 3,500 cases. However, there are only a few studies available on this technique, and most of these concentrate on the anterior segment. So when I discuss the use of heads-up surgery, I receive some common questions.

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About the Author

Claus Eckardt

Claus Eckardt is Chief of Ophthalmology at Klinikum Frankfurt, Höchst, Germany

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