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Retirement done right

Are you still practicing ophthalmology in retirement?

I see patients for half a day per week, and these are almost all patients that I have operated on in the past. You know, one of the things that makes ophthalmology unique is that we don’t disrobe anyone, and so our life in the clinic with them is much more relaxed and social. I’ve got patients that have been with me so long they’re more like friends; last month, I saw a woman in whom I did retinal detachment surgery when she was a young woman, she was a high myope, and much later I did cataract and IOL surgery on her. When she was in for a routine exam about a month ago she said, “You know Doctor Fine, when you first told me I had to go to the hospital to have my retina fixed, my biggest concern was where I was going to get a babysitter for my two-year-old son – he just celebrated his 44th birthday!” Such contact and continuity with people over a period of decades leads to a different relationship than the average doctor-patient relationship. When our surgery is highly successful, our patients absolutely love what we do – and we love being able to provide a wonderful enhancement of their lives.

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About the Author

George Beiko

George Beiko is Assistant Clinical Professor at McMaster University, and currently practices at St Catharine’s in Toronto specializing in cataract, anterior segment and refractive surgery. George also lectures at the University of Toronto.

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